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How to Clean Marble Countertops

Marble is used to create some of the most stunningly beautiful countertops around, but it does require a little extra TLC if you want it to remain free of dirt, scuffs, and stains. Unfortunately, not many people are aware of the fact that some cleaning agents and methods can have a negative impact on their marble countertops. To make sure yours stay looking as wonderful as the day they were installed, keep the following points in mind.

Use the Right Cleaning Agents

Marble is closely related to limestone, so it is soft, porous, and quite sensitive to the acids found in wine, citrus fruits, and many everyday cleaning products. Spilling coffee on your marble countertop can cause staining, but using an acidic cleaner can do damage all by itself.

This means that you need to look for pH-neutral cleaning products, although it is easier to simply pick up a specialty marble cleaner. Make sure that it is resistant to grease and water, rinse-free, and able to provide a streak-free finish. Additionally, make sure you read the safety instructions carefully before you use it.

Keep it Regular

When dealing with marble, it is crucial that you clean regularly in order to prevent discoloration and staining. You don’t need to spend hours each day scrubbing away, but you should never let dirt build up.

The best thing to do is commit to a regular cleaning schedule. Take a mild, bleach-free detergent or speciality marble cleaner, then add it to water. Lightly wipe down your countertops, then rinse with clean water and dry them off quickly with a micro-fibre cloth.

Seal It Up

Your marble countertops will probably come pre-sealed, but that seal won’t last forever. This means that you’ll need to commit to resealing every six months or so to ensure that your surfaces remain free from damage. Since countertops are used to make food, you can’t use just any sealant; look for one that has been approved for food preparation areas.

Go Natural

If you need to clean a part of your marble countertop right away in order to avoid staining, just create a quick and easy cleaning product by mixing one-part baking soda to 20-parts water. Wet a cloth with the solution, then apply to the appropriate area. Instead of using an abrasive brush or cloth, simply use increased pressure across stained areas. Leave to dry for 1-2 hours, then rinse with water and dry off with a clean cotton cloth.

How to Clean Granite Countertops and Worktops

Granite is an incredibly tough material that is able to last for decades when used for countertops and worktops. However, it isn’t invulnerable to damage, and even using the wrong kind of cleaning agent can have negative consequences. You’ll naturally want to keep your granite countertops looking their best. That doesn’t just mean cleaning– it also means knowing how to clean effectively.

Here are the three steps you need to take.

Step 1: Use the Correct Products

Don’t make the mistake of using abrasive materials or acidic chemicals when you’re cleaning your granite countertops. Granite might be tough, but the wrong products can do far more harm than good.

Luckily enough, there are plenty of specialist granite cleaners available. All you’ll need to do is find one, read the instructions, spray it across your granite countertops, and then wipe it off. Of course, you don’t need to use a specialist granite cleaner every time you use your countertops. A simple micro-fibre cloth and a small amount of water are good enough for everyday use – specialist cleaners only need to be used once or twice each week.

Step 2: Use a Sealer

Granite is a natural product, so it does come with some natural flaws. The most problematic property of granite is that it is slightly porous. It might seem odd to think of that hard, smooth surface as porous, but it contains tiny mineral channels that can be penetrated and stained.

The best way to prevent this from happening is by using a granite sealer. Just make sure you find one with a water-based formula. You’ll have to reseal every year or so, but this will go a long way towards keeping your granite countertops and worktops in like-new condition.

Step 3: Commit to Regular Cleaning

People often think that stone countertops and worktops are resilient enough towards staining and discolouration that they only need to be cleaned once in a blue moon, but this just isn’t the case. As with most other surfaces, the best way to keep granite looking its best is by committing to a regular cleaning schedule.

Taking the time to wipe down your granite countertops and worktops after each use and using a specialist cleaner on a regular basis will pay off in the long run, so make sure you develop a cleaning schedule and stick to it as closely as possible.

How to Clean a Marble Fireplace

Marble fireplaces form stunning centrepieces in living rooms all across the country, but they need to be properly maintained if they are to remain in pristine condition. Marble might be a glorious material with which to work, but it is also quite porous, meaning that dust and other contaminants can easily dull its appearance over time. Since even a misplaced mug of coffee can leave a nasty ring, you need to know exactly how to keep your marble fireplace looking its best.

Step One: Use the Right Materials

The fact that marble is extremely porous means that it will also absorb any liquids that you use to clean it. Many people only discover that certain cleaning agents should be avoided when it is already too late, so make sure you know what’s what before starting.

Conventional cleaning products and harsh chemicals should be avoided; they will damage the appearance of the stone when absorbed to its core, and they could even cause cracking across the surface.

In particular, make sure you avoid:

  • Baking Soda: Too abrasive – it could ruin the finish.
  • White Vinegar: Too Acidic – it can leave etches across the surface.
  • Limescale Remover: Another acidic product.

You’ll also want to avoid using any abrasive brushes and cloths. You don’t want to ruin the finish or damage the underlying material, so use a soft micro-fibre cloth to remove surface dust and dirt.

Step Two: Employ the Right Method

Now that you understand which products to use and which to avoid, you’ll need to know how to go about cleaning your marble fireplace. To start with, dip your cloth into some distilled water; you can distil some yourself by boiling it and then allowing it to cool, though you can also pick up distilled water from the supermarket.

Next, lightly wipe your cloth along the surface of the fireplace, paying special attention to any areas that have been stained. If you find that the water has not been effective, try using a specialist marble cleaning product. Read the label to familiarise yourself with the process before getting started, and make sure you conduct a test run on one small, out-of-the-way area of the fireplace to make sure no damage or discolouration occurs.

 

Cleaning a marble fireplace isn’t as tough as it sounds. In fact, you’ll find it easy as long as you know which products to use and how to use them.